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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Erosion, Debris Flows, and Environment in Mountain Regions (Iahs Publication, No. 209) found in the catalog.

Erosion, Debris Flows, and Environment in Mountain Regions (Iahs Publication, No. 209)

D. E. Walling

Erosion, Debris Flows, and Environment in Mountain Regions (Iahs Publication, No. 209)

by D. E. Walling

  • 22 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Intl Assn of Hydrological .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hydrology (freshwater),
  • Mountains,
  • Congresses,
  • Debris avalanches,
  • Environmental aspects,
  • Erosion

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsT. Hasolt (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages496
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8473062M
    ISBN 100947571388
    ISBN 109780947571382

    Mountain regions are very sensitive to hydrogeologic problems, and the strong focus on soil and water impacts corresponds to a very high representation of mountain sites (73 percent) among study locations. Environmental constraints on forest harvesting in the Marlborough sounds. in 'International Symposium on erosion, debris flow and. Valley or stream erosion occurs with continued water flow along a linear feature. The erosion is both downward, deepening the valley, and headward, extending the valley into the hillside, creating head cuts and steep banks. In the earliest stage of stream erosion, the erosive activity is dominantly vertical, the valleys have a typical V cross-section and the stream gradient is relatively steep.

    Geomorphology. The sediment that results from erosion in elevated or mountainous regions ultimately flows into the primary streams in the region where the streams act as a drainage system and carries the sediment to the alluvial plain. Due to the high degree of slope, the river/streams are typically classified as straight channels. References. Allen, C.D., , Changes in the landscape of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico: Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley.

      Weathering. Weathering is an erosional process that involves the mechanical wearing down of rock by a plant’s roots growing and pushing through it, ice expanding in its cracks, and abrasion from sediment pushed by wind and water, as well as the chemical break down of rock like limestone. Erosion along the base of the slope (stream erosion, wave action) Human activity (construction of highways, housing development) common in arid and semiarid environment, mountain region or area covered by volcanic ash. slumping a the head followed by debris flow and earth flow. 1st Geologic investigation.


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Erosion, Debris Flows, and Environment in Mountain Regions (Iahs Publication, No. 209) by D. E. Walling Download PDF EPUB FB2

For example, the debris flows in Wenjia Erosion (Sichuan Province, China) after the Wenchuan earthquake were formed by the following sequence of events: runoff, erosion, collapse, engulfment. Erosion, Debris Flows and Environment in Mountain Regions (Proceedings of the Chengdu {R.

Ziemer}, title = {Erosion, Debris Flows and Environment in Mountain Regions (Proceedings of the mountain region debris flow data collection caspar creek experimental watershed second-growth forest. Debris flows, occurring in the mountain region from May to September, are most widespread and destructive.

At elevations above m a.s.l., where vegetation becomes sparse, debris cover may reach a thickness of tens of metres providing material for debris flows (Seinova, ).

Particularly prone to hydro-geological hazard is the uppermost Author: Giovanni Vezzoli, Eduardo Garzanti, Mara Limonta, Giuditta Radeff. CMFs in the glacier environment have been responsible for a number of major natural disasters in mountain regions since These events include the Huaraz disaster, Peru (Figure ; Oppenheim,Heim,Carey,Carey, ), the Huascarán mass flows of andPeru (Evans et al., a), the Kolka Glacier event ofRussia (Haeberli et al.,Cited by: Such debris flows deliver substantial sediment to lower gradient reaches of wadis or to tributary mountain Debris Flows (Figure 5e).

If these debris flows occur above road cuts, they may entrain intact or failed material from cut and fill slopes and can exacerbate or initiate failures in cut and fill materials (Youssef et al., d).

As such Cited by: 1. The erosion and deposition of debris flows at Jiangjia Gully in Dongchuan section of Yunnan province, southwestern China, was surveyed at 12 cross sections from to Deposition occurred in most sections because of the low debris-flow magnitude.

The result was an increase in their elevations except for two sections at D17 and D19, where the channel was diverted in September debris-flow deposits going back to the Pleistocene, we were able to draw inferences about recurrence intervals and the geomorphic role of debris flows in this semiarid mountain range.

Debris flows are slurry flows of poorly-sorted rock and soil debris mixed with % water (Costa, ). Debris flows. With Australia's Hillsides Stripped Bare By Fire, Scientists Rush To Predict Mudflows Heavy rains in eastern Australia are causing mudslides and debris flows in areas that burned.

Scientists are. Relation to Lithology and Environmental Controls Mass Movements: Introduction Landslides and Rockfalls Rapid Flows of Wet Debris Creep Overland Flow: General Runoff Erosion Lithology and Form Climate and Form Examples of Slope Forms in Different Regions Spitzbergen and Scandinavia Central Appalachian Mountain Region Hawaii Southern Sudan.

These Wildfire/Watershed Assessments identify hazards, prioritize 6th level watersheds, and recommend measures to protect those watersheds that provide or convey critical community water supplies from the adverse effects of post-wildfire hydrologic changes, including flooding, erosion, debris flows.

Over much of the world the erosion of landscape, including the reduction of mountains and the building of plains, is brought about by the flow of water. As the rain falls and collects in watercourses, the process of erosion not only degrades the land, but the products of erosion themselves become the tools with which the rivers carve the valleys in which they flow.

including rockfalls, rockslides, and debris flows, that pose a geologic hazard to people and property in the Khumbu region. 1, Indeed, it has been documented that earthquakes often trigger landslides and avalanches of all sizes.

9 Understanding the glacial and geomorphological. outburst floods are transformed into debris flows as they pass through the incised reach (Zhang ; Du et al a, b; Chengdu Institute of Mountain Hazards FIGURE 1 Debris flows in Guxiang and the measured values of daily rainfall and maximum daily temperature at Bomi during – (Source: Debris flows, Mountain Research and.

If uplift had occurred without erosion, a great dome, somewhat like that illustrated by the broken lines of the profile (fig. 2, p. 16), but more or less warped and broken, with surface cracked and uneven, would now stand in place of the highly varied complex of peaks, ridges, and gorges which characterize the mountain region.

Appalachian Mountains - Appalachian Mountains - Geology: The Appalachians are among the oldest mountains on Earth, born of powerful upheavals within the terrestrial crust and sculpted by the ceaseless action of water upon the surface.

The two types of rock that characterize the present Appalachian ranges tell much of the story of the mountains’ long existence. Rainfall is one of the main factors that drive soil erosion, leading to environmental problems such as increased frequency and severity of debris flows, and ecosystem damage.

Dedkov AP, Moszherin VI () Erosion and sediment yield in mountain regions of the world. In: Walling DE, Davies TR, Hasholt B (eds) Erosion, debris flows and environment in Mountain Regions.

IAHS Publicationpp. 29– Google Scholar. Nepal has a complicated geophysical structure that is prone to various kinds of disasters (soil erosion, debris flow, glacial lake outburst floods, bank erosion, concentrated monsoon rains, earthquakes, forest fires, epidemics, avalanches, and snowstorms), including flood in lower plain regions and landslides in hilly and mountain regions Institute of Mountain Disasters S Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences Abstract Environment is degrading, soil seriously eroded and soil and water losses intensifying in dry valleys of Southwest China.

Notable is the in­ tensive gravitational erosion, which accelera­ tes environment degradation and activates ha­ zardous debris flows. The identification of debris flow deposits in cores and valley sediments could be used to address their frequency of occurrence, volume of material transported, and spatial distribution.

Surficial mapping, subsurface sampling, and dating studies could address the effectiveness of debris flows as agents of erosion at Yucca Mountain.

The objectives of this study are to simulate the topographical changes associated with rainfall and the consequential debris flow using terrestrial LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging). Three rainfall events between July 9 and Jtriggered a number of debris flows at Jecheon County in Korea.

Rain fell at a rate of 64 mm/h, producing &#x;mm of total accumulation during this.The John Day Country of today covers an area of 4, square miles in the southwestern part of the Blue Mountain region of Oregon, and is in the borderland between two major geologic provinces.

One, to the north, is the Columbia Plateau which consists of flat or gently tilted flows of basalt covering aboutsquare miles.Contaminants can be mobilized by wind and water erosion, debris flow, mass failure, and dissolution in water (Bodí et al., ; Smith et al., ).

However, a specific process is often dominant in a particular landscape (Moody et al., ) and can be responsible for the majority of contaminant mobilization and delivery to water systems.